Friday Field Update No. 11

Happy Friday! The end to another week and the beginning to a beautiful, SUNNY weekend! 

I would like to start off by apologizing for skipping last week. It was a very difficult and busy Thursday/Friday. And those happen to be the days that I write this blog post. I prefer to write it at the end of the week, so the information I share with you is as up to date as possible.

IMG_2063.JPG

So, back to my excuse. Here is a little peak into an apple growers life in the spring. There is a fungus called scab. It creates a horrible “scab” on the leaves and fruit of apple trees. It is made up of pure evil. If you have apples, you will have scab, if you don’t protect them. It is everywhere. You cannot escape. Luckily, resistance is not futile! As long as you give up on having a social life, you are good to go. Scab works like many other fungi: spores. In the spring it exists as a structure called an ascocarp. These ascocarp grow ascospores and when they are wetted(mostly rain), release the spores to infect green apple tissue(leaves or fruit). In order for us to avoid an infection, we need to have a spray on the trees that creates a protective barrier so when the spores land, they are killed and have no chance to cause an infection. However, when it rains it also washes off the protective barrier. So when the next rain event happens, we need to have our trees covered again. So goes the almost endless cycle of scab spraying. Right up until around this time of year. Last Thursday and Friday we needed to cover the apples for the rain event Saturday night, but it was windy both days. That means we put in a normal work day, and then when the wind finally died down in the late evening, after dinnertime, sprayed the apples. There. That’s my excuse. I’m sorry I chose apples over this.

On to less depressing and stressful topics! We picked the first strawberries of the year Wednesday! When it finally stopped drizzling… These are some of the most beautiful berries you will see during the season because they are mostly what I call the “king berry.” In the field, the berries grow in a cluster, starting as blossoms. The king blossom is always first, and when it matures is always the biggest berry out of the cluster. Therefore, I call it a king berry! They are big, beautiful and so refreshing after a winter without homegrown fruit. Harvesting may be a difficult and sweaty job, but at the same time it eases the mind, and makes all that hard work of growing the crop feel like it was worth something.

IMG_2047.JPG

Other good news, the raspberries are sprouting lots of beautiful leaves, they seem very happy. Just like I promised, what appeared to be lifeless twigs are now bursting with fresh, green leaf tissue! Yesterday we added mulch at the base of each plant to prevent the weeds from going crazy.

IMG_2043.JPG

The string beans we seeded on the plastic have popped up and spread their wings to take flight. What I love about watching seedlings germinate is what happens to the seed itself. If you look closely you can see that the lowest pair of bright green leaves are actually what used to be the seed. I don’t understand exactly what has happened, but maybe it has actually turned into leaves; growing chloroplasts and digesting that beautiful sunshine.

IMG_2046.JPG

Can anyone guess what this beautiful, green, leafy veggie is in the picture above? The first one to comment and get it right on Facebook or the blog gets a gold star!

Well, thanks for reading! I hope your week is as sweet as these strawberries! See you back here next Friday!

Bonus picture below: Pickle transplants making a pickle forest!

IMG_2011.JPG

Friday Field Update No. 10

Happy Friday, and welcome back to my little corner of the internet. Today’s topic is my mortal enemy: WEEDS. But first, an adorable family picture!

IMG_2009.JPG

If you look at the top of our website, you will find it says we are a farming family and this is the start of my own little family. I thought it would be nice to share so you could get to know me a little more. This is my lovely wife Mandy, and our ferocious canine Obi-Wan Kenobi (we call him Obi for short). Last night we were picking out some flowers to plant in our containers. We kinda just pick out whatever we like and then try to find some way to make it all look good. It’s really quite fun. Having Obi around always makes things more stressful- fun! I mean more fun. He’s a pure angel most of the time, but can turn into quite the devil...

A rather large weed erupting from our pea field. 

A rather large weed erupting from our pea field. 

Tiny tomato plant that grew from the seed of a tomato from last year left on the ground. It is now a weed. 

Tiny tomato plant that grew from the seed of a tomato from last year left on the ground. It is now a weed. 

Ok, back to the real devil at hand. Do you know what a weed really is? Have you ever taken time to think about it? I learned the true definition only a couple of years ago. A weed is any plant that is undesirable. That means that weeds are dandelions or quack grass growing in a strawberry field. It also means it is a tomato plant growing between the rows of tomatoes that we are actually cultivating, like in this picture. This tiny tomato plant will just be in the way, not getting enough water, getting stepped on, and possibly causing disease. Even if it did grow well, it is increasing our population(number of plants in a certain area) which is not what we want. It’s hard to believe that a tomato plant in a tomato field is a weed, but in this case that’s all it is.

IMG_1995.JPG

High tunnel update! The plants are doing marvelous. As you can see, they are really filling out the space. Fortunately for us, we have been working with Cornell Cooperative Extension employees for the past couple years with their High Tunnel research. They have been sending samples of our leaves into a lab to get them analyzed in order to evaluate the nutrition of the plants. This has been extremely beneficial for us. With these foliar samples taken every other week, we can really fine tune the fertilizer we are feeding the tomatoes in order to give them exactly what they need to make ripe, juicy tomatoes. Our first foliar results are in and they look great! We are right on track to producing a great crop of early tomatoes in our high tunnel.

IMG_2003.JPG

Over in the Strawberry field, things are happening. We have awesome looking green berries, plants still blooming, and a friendly bird nest. I haven’t identified the bird that laid this beauty yet. It is similar to a killdeer, but much smaller. Maybe a plover? But yes, green berries! Look how big that one is. They will be ready soon I hope, I can’t wait!

We are finally able to plant some of our more sensitive transplants now that the threat for frost is ninety nine percent gone. With mother nature, there is never a 100% guarantee. We planted our first planting of zucchini, and lettuce. This wagon is full of pickling cucumbers. They are on the wagon not to be transported quite yet, but to harden off, as we call it. When the plants are growing in the greenhouse, they are happy as a clam. No brutal wind to knock them around and a nice, consistent water to feed them and quench their thirst. If we were to put these plants out into the field right away, their survival rate would not be very good at all. By leaving them in their trays, and limiting the amount of stress we expose them to, we can help smooth their transition into the field, in order to keep our plants happy and healthy. Just the way we like them.

IMG_2002.JPG

Ok, that is all for this week. Thank you so much for reading and hope to see you back here next Friday!

Friday Field Update No. 8

It’s been a crazy week! We planted Raspberries today which I am super excited about. We started going to public market with hanging baskets and other annuals on Thursday and Saturday mornings, and for a few Sundays also. We have also been ramping up our market and greenhouse for mother’s day. Lot’s going on, like usual. Here are a few pictures I took this week with some interesting info.

IMG_1914.JPG

A gorgeous full moon over our farm a couple nights ago. I learned this is called the flower moon due to the abundant blooms this time of year. You can just make out the apple blossoms past the sweet corn under the row cover. The closest trees are peaches and plums.  

FullSizeRender.jpg

Look at these crazy worms I found! Just kidding! They’re seeds. Calendula seeds to be specific! Calendula are beautiful, large daisy shaped flowers that have edible petals. They are one of the seven edible flower varieties I am trying out this year. I seeded all of them earlier this week and very eagerly await their germination! The lemon gem marigolds popped up after only two days. This didn’t surprise me because they were seeded very shallow, with only a light dusting of soil over the seeds. The red runner bean however, was seeded one to one and a half inches deep.

IMG_1907.JPG

Do you notice anything unusual with this picture? There is more than just flowers and pottin soil. A gray tree frog! There have been a lot of them so far this year. I think they have been really enjoying all the rain. You can find these little guys in the craziest places. I saw a little green one hopping around the floor of one of our other greenhouses. They certainly are beautiful creatures.

FullSizeRender.jpg

Water is essential for plants to grow, however it also can cause many different diseases if there is too much of it in the air or ground. I found these dew drops in the tomatoes first thing in the morning immediately after we removed the row cover. Plants are constantly giving off water vapor, called transpiring. And if you leave them in the confined space under the row cover too long, all that humidity may cause some nasty things to happen. That is why we have to remove the row cover, and open the peak vents on the end walls of the high tunnel even if it is cold outside. Our large greenhouse is monitored by a computer that will turn on the fans in order to reduce humidity or temperature. Even if it is bringing in cold air, we have to do it in order to get rid of all that problematic moisture.

Thanks for reading and see you back here next Friday!

Friday Field Update No. 5

PEACH FUN FACT. These are strong independent blossoms, and don't need a pollinator like honeybees, or other native nectar lovers. Similar to tomatoes, all these flowers need is a little breeze and they are good to go, unlike apples and many other fruit. 

PEACH FUN FACT. These are strong independent blossoms, and don't need a pollinator like honeybees, or other native nectar loversSimilar to tomatoes, all these flowers need is a little breeze and they are good to go, unlike apples and many other fruit. 

We don't like to count our eggs before they hatch, but I will share this bit of news with you. For the first time in three years, the majority of our peach blossoms are still alive at the end of April! Again, we don't want to get ahead of ourselves, but we are very excited to see some of the early peach varieties in full bloom at this moment. It is interesting to watch different rows bloom at different times, based on when that variety will mature. These flowers are a good sign that the ovary of the flower is still viable(not frozen), and will produce a fruit. We are not out of the woods yet, however. There are still many hurdles to overcome until harvest, but at least now we are mostly in control of the situation. The blossoms are still in danger if nature decides to send a heavy frost our way.  

Early yellow Shiro plums!

Early yellow Shiro plums!

Along with peaches, the earliest sweet cherry and plum varieties are in full bloom. Right outside the window of my house, actually. It's only a matter of weeks now until the bird squawker is blasting it's cacophonous distress calls(scaring the birds as well as ensuring I wake up with the first rays of sun). These calls imitate a bird in pain, or imminent danger. It tells the other birds to "Run while you can! Save yourself!" This is a very useful tool when the cherries are ripe and juicy. It helps us fend off the Robins, Starlings, blackbirds, and many other pesky birds while we harvest what we have worked so hard for!

Beautiful morning sun gracing our first pea planting. 

Beautiful morning sun gracing our first pea planting. 

As the fruit trees blossom, we are hard at work getting the vegetables in the ground. Planting season is finally upon us, and I couldn't be happier! Sowing seeds in the ground and helping bring so much life and nutrition into this world are some of my favorite parts of being a farmer. The first planting of beets, peas and sweet corn are in the ground. I just checked on the peas yesterday, about a week after I planted the seed and they are already halfway to the surface! Peas, along with the beets, are great at germinating in cooler soil temperatures like we have in the spring. Sweet corn has a little more difficult time with colder soil. However, we can use row cover to help warm it up a little bit. The row cover we use is a very large, white cloth-like material that holds in the heat while keeping out the cold by slightly insulating the ground. This is extremely effective on a cold day when the sun comes out, warming the ground and the row cover even more. More sweet corn, beet and pea plantings soon to come along with lots more veggies and fruits. 

I want to apologize for the lack of a Friday Field Update last Friday. I decided to take a holiday blog break, thank you for understanding. Also thank you for reading this week and see you back here next week!

Donut peach blossoms! 

Donut peach blossoms! 

Friday Field Update No. 4

Oh Spring... I thought only March was supposed to enter like a lion. Then today happened. Nature sure does the darndest things.  

Every year I am extremely grateful for many things about the land we grow our crops on. In the spring especially, I enjoy being able to work our ground behind the market extremely early. This is because the land is very porous due to the large amount of gravel it contains. Having well drained soil is why I am not worrying too much about our fields getting too wet from the alarming amount of snow that fell today. Our fields are experts at dealing with all this spring precipitation. 

Beautiful Spring view of the new Strawberry patch planted last year. 

Beautiful Spring view of the new Strawberry patch planted last year. 

I always find it fascinating when someone says they don't know why strawberries are called strawberries. I suppose not everyone grows them, so not everyone knows that you are supposed to cover them with straw for the winter to help insulate the plant and it's roots from the harsh cold. But low and behold, this is where you get the straw in strawberry! In the late fall after a few hard frosts, we go out and spread straw over all the plants. Then, in the spring, you know its time to rake the straw between the rows (that nice comfy cushion to kneel on when you're picking) when the forsythia is in full bloom. We let nature tell us when it's safe. This will probably be happening within a couple weeks!

Garlic coming up!

Garlic coming up!

Right next to the strawberries you can see our beautiful rows of garlic. Garlic is planted in the fall, and over winters in the ground, similar to tulips and daffodils. The tips of the plants appear to be burned, and we think this is from the cold, cold temperatures. However this happens every year and it doesn't seem to cause any problems. If you look closely, you can notice lots of holes in the black plastic we use to cover the rows. Sometimes severe wind can damage to the plastic, but these appear to be caused by our friends the deer. We have an abundance of them, and last year they ate our corn plants, cucumbers, zucchini, and apple trees. Pretty much anything we planted down there they helped themselves to. Such fun. 

Thanks for reading!

Friday Field Update No.2

Spring is finally here! And with it some more typical spring temperatures. With the deluge of snow Stella dumped on us, the fields are soaking up all that meltwater. I'm hoping that extra moisture is not going to delay the pea planting too much, which we prefer to get in the ground in the first week of April. It is only about a week away after all! We also put the beets in at that time. Both of these seeds germinate well in the cold soil, and are hardy plants that can do well in cooler Spring months.

Sweet Cherry buds getting ready to bloom.

Sweet Cherry buds getting ready to bloom.

Unfortunately the tomatoes have not been grafted yet. That is scheduled in for the next couple days. I will have lots of photos and details about that in next week's update, don't you worry.

Inside our germination chamber, a baby pepper plant emerges.

Inside our germination chamber, a baby pepper plant emerges.

Grafting was delayed partially due to the large amount of annual and perennial shipments we received this week. Managing this and actually getting the job done right demanded most of our time. We filled hundreds of flats worth of plants, which means we had to have all those flats prepared and ready to go. These come in many different shapes and sizes as many of you know, and we fill them all ourselves. We are very meticulous on how we go about this process. Each pot and cell needs to be filled right to the top with loose soil. This is important so the roots can easily grow and breathe. Airflow to the roots is just as important as water. Also, consistent soil level is crucial for all the plants to grow evenly which makes the enormous and endless task of watering more manageable. The machine we use is actually homemade, constructed back when we first built and opened the greenhouse in the early nineties. This is actually one of my favorite jobs on the farm. 

Thanks for reading, and catch you back here next week!

Where to Find Us This Spring

We will be out in the world, sharing information about our CSA this Spring. If you would like to meet us face to face and ask questions about Kirby's CSA, here is where you can find us! We would love to see you!

  • Tuesday April 4th, 12pm, Gleason Works (Employees Only, including  Conifer, CCCSR and Triline)

 

  • Thursday April 13th, 12pm, General Code in the Great Room (Employees Only, any businesses in Building 1)

Friday Field Update

Our baby rootstock plants, taking the transplant very well. 

Our baby rootstock plants, taking the transplant very well. 

It’s the Friday Field Update, with Farmer Chad!

Happy St. Patrick’s Day everyone! Our greenhouse sure is repping it's green, I hope you are! In this brand new weekly post, I will keep all of you updated with a brief overview of the happenings during the past week on our Farm, along with some pictures, maybe a video or two, and some fun facts.

Another winter is coming to a close (maybe…) which means our greenhouses are filling with green again! From Superbells to Tomatoes to almost every vegetable we grow, the heat is pumping and the oxygen is flowing.

What I am most excited about this past week is our high tunnel tomatoes. High tunnels provide several great benefits to growing tomatoes. They protect the fruit and plants from the damaging elements, especially water. High tunnels also hold in a little heat to help extend the homegrown tomato season, which for us is mainly the spring so we can get those awesome tomatoes as soon as possible! Lastly, they are still grown in the earth so they maintain that excellent field flavor.

This will be the third year we have grown tomatoes in the ground under cover, but this is the first year we will be grafting all of our plants. Growing any crop in the same soil repeatedly is not a good idea. This leads to a buildup of soil-borne diseases which can be really nasty. However, it is no small feat to move a high tunnel. So in lieu of moving the tunnel, we graft the plants. We select a variety of tomato that will provide the fruit we desire as the top half of the plant (scion), and the variety that will give the plant a vigorous and disease resistant bottom half (rootstock). So even though we only need 400 plants for our tunnel, we grow 800 for the grafting process. 400 scion plants and 400 rootstocks, with a little extra of course, in case we have any casualties. We cut the tomato plants in half and attach the top half of the scion variety to the bottom half of the rootstock variety, and let them heal together. Last week we bare-root transplanted the seedlings, and this coming week we think the plants will be ready for grafting! Stay tuned next week for pictures.


That’s all for this week. Thanks for reading and I look forward to sharing more of our farm activities next week!

NEW! Smaller CSA Share Option

In response to requests for a smaller CSA share, Kirby's is offering a new option this season! 

Our brand new Quarter Share is designed for anyone that doesn't need as much produce, but still wants to be a part of our CSA. Quarter Share boxes will basically have the same contents as our Half Share, but with half the amount. As far as what's in the box, we might not be able to fit everything in every week (examples below). However, we know that variety is important, it's one of our main focuses, so we'll do our best to make sure you get a little bit of everything.  Read on for pack list comparisons!


The following comparisons were created using 2016 packlists.

Quarter Share

June
2 Heads Lettuce
1/4 lb Rhubarb
Pint of Strawberries
5 Garlic Scapes

 

July
1/2 Pint Blueberries
1 Pint Sweet Cherries
1 Pickles
1 Kohlrabi
1 lbTomatoes

August
1 Cantaloupe
1 lbs Carrots
1 Pickles
1lb Tomatoes
2 Peppers


September
1 Quart Apples
1 Cabbage
5 Assorted Sweet Peppers
1 Eggplant

 

October
1 Quart Apples
1 Cauliflower
1.5 lbs Onions
1 Delicata Squash
1 Garlic

November
1/2 lb Brussel Sprouts
1/2 Gallon Cider
1/2 oz Mulling Spices
1 Acorn Squash
1 Sweet Dumpling Squash

Half Share

June
2 Heads Lettuce
1/2 lb Rhubarb
Quart of Strawberries
5 Garlic Scapes
1 Cilantro Plant
1 Bunch Radishes

July
1 Pint Blueberries
1 Quart Sweet Cherries
3 Pickles
2 Kohlrabi
1 lbTomatoes

August
1 Cantaloupe
2lbs Carrots
2 Pickles
1lb Tomatoes
4 Peppers
1 Watermelon

September
2 Quarts Apples
1 Cabbage
5 Assorted Sweet Peppers
1 Eggplant
1/2 Gallon Cider
4-5 Beets with Greens

October
2 Quarts Apples
1 Cauliflower
3lbs Onions
3 Delicata Squash
3 Garlic

November
2 Quarts Apples
1 lb Brussel Sprouts
1/2 Gallon Cider
1/2 oz Mulling Spices
1 Acorn Squash
1 Sweet Dumpling Squash



 


End of the Year Sales!

On December 24th we close our doors for the 2016 season. (We'll see you again in the Spring - our doors will be open on May 1st and our greenhouse will be overflowing with flowers!)  

For the last week of the season, stop in to take advantage of our awesome end of the year sales! Stock up on homegrown and locally grown produce for the winter, and finish up your Christmas shopping.

25% off  Apples

25% off  Poinsettias

20% off  All Gift Shop

20% off  Jams

 

Produce Available

Homegrown: Apples, Winter Squash, Garlic

Locally Grown: Potatoes (5lb, 20lb, or 50lb bags, while supplies last), Onions (3lb, or 10lb bags, while supplies last)

 

Christmas at Kirby's

We're open until December 24th!

There is so much to find at Kirby's this holiday season:
Ornaments and Gifts; Christmas Trees;  Poinsettias;  Handmade Wreaths

=

Trim the tree with vintage inspired glass ornaments, warm and cozy embroidered felt, rustic country themed clip ornaments, elegant snowflakes, or sparkly-Christmas-under-glass style ornaments, just to name a few examples.

upload.jpg
upload.jpg
  Vintage inspired glass ornaments
  Embroidered felt ornaments for a warm and cozy theme.
upload.jpg

We have a great selection of affordable gifts at $20, $10, even $5! Our brand new "Cherished Treasures" section is packed with an ever changing variety of vintage and antique items, such as beautiful glassware, bowls, kitchen implements, decorations and furniture. 

  scented mug mats and coasters
  Santa themed gifts
  handy gift bags of different sizes

upload.jpg

Brighten your home with a colorful poinsettia.

Traditional red, festive Glitter (red and white speckles), beautiful white, Marble, Pink, or Picasso (speckled pink) are available from tiny 4.5" pots to impressive 8" pots. A poinsettia can also be a thoughtful hostess or host gift.

With our many years of experience growing poinsettias, you can be confident in selecting a high quality plant to take home or gift.

upload.jpg

Below, from left to right: Picasso, a stunning break from traditional red; Marble, Pink, and White; and our 8" pans, a low and wide plant, perfect for centerpieces.

upload.jpg
upload.jpg
upload.jpg

Christmas Wreaths and Local Christmas Trees

Our wreaths are especially thick and fluffy, handmade on extra-sturdy, heavy-duty metal frames. We use a variety of greens from frasier fir, to pine and juniper to create fantastic texture and color variations. Custom order a wreath and we'll create a masterpiece just for you!

silver.JPG
upload.jpg

Our trees are grown right here in the Rochester area. Choose from Frasier Fir, Douglas Fir, or Concolor. Prices range from $20 for small table top trees, to $60 for our tallest trees.

upload.jpg
upload.jpg

Apple Gift Baskets: four quart, eight quart, or half bushel baskets of Kirbygrown apples are a unique present for clients, coworkers, friends and family. Choose the gift you would like to include, or select from our Gift Basket themes: 

  • Caramel Apple, with delicious Annie's Caramels, caramel apple dip and a handy apple slicer
  • Afternoon Tea, with a scented fabric coaster, maple sticks, and a mug of your choice
  • A Taste of New York, with Kutter's extra sharp cheddar cheese, local maple sugar candy, and Seward's chocolate Santas.
upload.jpg
upload.jpg

Kirby's Annual Customer Appreciation Day

Friday, November 11th, 10am-6pm

This Friday, we dedicate the day to thanking all of customers for another great season! Stop by to enjoy good deals, delicious samples and refreshments, and our cheery smiling faces to welcome you. We hope you come in and enjoy the day with us!

New stock is on display, including many new Christmas Items, Beaded rings, linens, dishes, and Thanksgiving decor.


Sales

  • 20% off all Gift Shop


Samples & Refreshments

  • Try a taste of Nundae Mustard, McCutheon's Jam, and our own freshly bottled honey!

  • We're baking up some of our popular apple cake mixes with homegrown Cortland apples.

  • Sweet and Savory Dips with homegrown fruits and veggies for dipping.

  • Enjoy a cup of hot Kale and White Bean Soup

  • As always, we'll have a fresh batch of homemade Kirby applesauce too.

  • Complimentary Coffee and Hot Mulled Cider

upload.jpg
upload.jpg
upload.jpg
upload.jpg
upload.jpg
upload.jpg
upload.jpg
upload.jpg
upload.jpg

PEARS

upload.jpg

We always have an abundance of pears in late September/early October. At this very moment many of them are the perfect ripeness for eating or canning - golden yellow, sweet, and juicy.

Some area just beginning to go around the bend - they are a little soft with brown spots, but still super sweet and juicy, perfect for baking and cooking. We sell these as second quality, which means you can get a great deal at half price.

I brought home a dozen or so of the less-then-perfect pears and had some fun in the kitchen. Here's two recipes for you to try...


upload.jpg

Pears for the Baby

First I made a puree for the baby. Leaving the peels on but removing the cores and stems, I cut the rinsed pears into chunks and pureed them in the food processor until smooth. After filling an ice cube tray there was some left, which brings us to recipe number 2!


PEAR SAUCE

I'm not sure if I've ever had pear butter, and I've definitely never made it, so this was a fun experiment! The end result is an amazing little bowl full of pure Autumn deliciousness so I'll be making it again soon. Reading other recipes online, I see that orange zest is a popular ingredient. There's definitely room to make this recipe your own.

upload.jpg

6-8 pears, cored and pureed
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
Dash of cloves (careful, cloves are powerful!)
Pinch of nutmeg

  1. Pour your fresh pear puree into a medium sauce pan.
  2. Add the spices and stir till blended.
  3. On medium heat, bring it up to a gentle simmer.
  4. As the puree begins to thicken, reduce the heat to low and continue to gently simmer, stirring occasionally. 
  5. Cook until you it gets as thick as you would like it. Store in a tightly lidded container in your fridge for 7-10 days.

* This recipe has no added sweeteners. If you would like a sweeter Pear Butter, I recommend Maple Syrup or honey (both available at the market!) but wait until the end to add it, when you'll know for sure if it needs it. Until about 10 minutes before it was done, I was skeptical that it would turn out right. But the flavors intensified a lot near the end. 

Early Autumn at Kirby's

We love Autumn at Kirby's! The colors, the smells, and the delicious flavors of Fall, are all filling our market right now.

Our first planting of Mums is in full bloom! Keep the color going all season with later varieties that bloom through October.

Our first planting of Mums is in full bloom! Keep the color going all season with later varieties that bloom through October.

In Season

Homegrown: Apples, Sweet Peppers, Hot Peppers, Broccoli, Beets, Kale, Turnips, Cabbage, Garlic, Tomatoes (Plum, Canning, Regular, Heirloom, Cherry, Grape), Pumpkins, Gourds, and Apple Cider

Locally Grown: Parsnips, Carrots, Potatoes, Onions, Shiitake Mushrooms, Pears

upload.jpg

Pumpkins!

Big and small, warty or smooth, yellow, orange, red, or white... create a beautiful pumpkin display with stacks, piles and rows of these amazing vegetables. Add perennial foliage plants for more texture and color.

Asters give the perfect pop of purple color to contrast with the warm tones of pumpkins and mums.

Asters give the perfect pop of purple color to contrast with the warm tones of pumpkins and mums.

upload.jpg
upload.jpg

Apples!

 Honeycrisp, Autumn Crisp, Cortland, Macintosh, Gala, Blondee, Jonamac, and Gingergold

upload.jpg
upload.jpg
upload.jpg
We have three different kinds of beets: Golden, which had a very mild, sweet flavor; Candy Cane, with beautiful red and white stripes; and regular Red Beets. Pickup a peck or half bushel to put up some beets today!

We have three different kinds of beets: Golden, which had a very mild, sweet flavor; Candy Cane, with beautiful red and white stripes; and regular Red Beets. Pickup a peck or half bushel to put up some beets today!

upload.jpg
Candy Cane Beets

Candy Cane Beets

Find what you need at Kirby's to create an Autumn feast, or a simple dinner. Beets, potatoes, carrots, onions, garlic, and turnips  - choose a few or all of the above and fill a pan for roasted fall vegetables

The end of September is the very peak of growing season, as the last remnants of summer overlap the beginnings of Fall. So much is ready now! Enjoy some lingering flavors of summer with Roasted Red Peppers and Roasted Tomatoes.  Browse our Recipe Index for more seasonal recipes.

Bartlett Pears, ready to eat!

Bartlett Pears, ready to eat!

Winter Squash Varieties: Acorn, Butternut, Buttercup, Delicata, Sweet Dumpling, and Pie Pumpkins.

Winter Squash Varieties: Acorn, Butternut, Buttercup, Delicata, Sweet Dumpling, and Pie Pumpkins.

Happy Fall! Hope to see you soon!

upload.jpg